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 Featured Project

Karst Aquifer Portal

Tumbling Creek Cavesnail, [Photo: David Ashley, US Fish and Wildlife]
Tumbling Creek Cavesnail, [Photo: David Ashley, US Fish and Wildlife]

The Karst Aquifer portal highlights the Edwards, Roswell and Ozarks aquifers.  Karst aquifers are limestone (or other easily-dissolved rock) that produce karst features, such as sinkholes, cave systems and springs, over time as the rock dissolves and fractures.  These features provide niche habitats for a wide variety of threatened and endangered species.  The Karst Aquifer portal features information and data, as well as an interactive mapping application, on groundwater and surface water conditions, precipitation, threatened and endangered species in the Edwards, Roswell and Ozarks aquifers.


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 Water Resources

image of the dam at Lake Conroe, Texas, courtesy of the San Jacinto River Authority
The dam at Lake Conroe, Texas [Photo: San Jacinto River Authority]

Water resource management is a key element of sustainable development.  Finite amounts of both surface and ground water combined with a growing population require careful management and planning with foresight.  Monitoring, spatial and temporal studies, modeling water management scenarios and statistical data analysis of ground and surface water quality and quantity are all important in the management of water resources in the Gulf Coast Region.

HARC compiles and manages numerous databases describing environmental quality, biological and water resources, and aquatic and terrestrial habitats in its region. Information technology tools and geographic information systems allow HARC to translate the data into information through the development of environmental indicators, statistical results, spatial and temporal analysis and to analyze changes in ecosystem and water resources. Integration, analysis, and dissemination of data and information regarding important water issues is considered key to advancing more effective decision-making regarding the sustainable management of water resources and water quality.


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 Featured Project

Drought Information Portal

Map of drought in Texas, courtesy of Houston Advanced Researh Center

Drought is a natural regular feature of any regional climate, including the Central Southwest Gulf Coast Region. Drought is defined as a deficiency in normal precipitation over a protracted time period, but can be exacerbated by unusually high temperatures and winds, or unusually low levels of humidity. These conditions can cause vegetation to dry out, creating optimal conditions for wildfire. Over 800 wildfires have occurred in Texas this year, fueled by this abundance of extremely dry vegetation.

Check out the Drought Information Portal for resources on drought including maps and images of drought-affected areas in CSWGCIN.

 


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